Pigs in a Pickle

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You can call me Donna Reed.  Well, maybe Betty Crocker instead.  Let me explain.  I’m on a retro food kick in a big way.  And just so I don’t offend anyone, I’m calling retro foods anything that reminds me of my childhood as well, so I’m throwing myself under the bus too when it comes to age!  I opted for the Betty Crocker reference instead of Mrs. Reed because she was supposed to represent the picturesque housewife with the perfectly coiffed hair, pressed apron, and sassy little pumps who flitted about a perfectly clean and tidy little home.  Hmmmm.  Hair – I have some.  Apron – I have one.  It is stuffed in the back of my entryway closet.  Pumps?  I like slippers better.  And clean and tidy home?  A for effort?  Betty Crocker was probably perfect too, now that I’m thinking about it.  Whatever.  Call me JB.

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It has been lonely here around the house.  Ben’s busy time of year is here, so he’s been on the road.  A lot.  You would think that without distraction or obligation I’d find myself knocking off all of those things that seem to always be on my list.  You know, laundry, cleaning…  yeah right.  Motivation walks out the door, packed away safely in Ben’s suitcase and I race home after work each day to jump into my pajamas and curl up under the blankets on the couch with a pup on my lap.  Even making dinner seems like a giant chore.  I really am terrible at preparing food for one.  To be honest, I’m terrible at preparing food for two.  We always have copious amounts of leftovers, which tends to suit us and our budget just fine as we typically have the best looking (and I’m going to go out on a limb here and say best tasting) lunch among our peers.  Is it bad if I love that my coworkers always ask what I’m eating after they catch a whiff as I walk back to my desk?

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Anyway, dinner for one is hard.  And it is even harder because something in my brain says when eating for one, this is a good week to save up on the grocery budget and to eat cheap.  So cheap, small quantities that can keep my interest for both dinner and my leftover lunches send my brain searching.  Because ultimately, these nights alone are my chance to eat whatever I want, whatever I crave, especially if it is something Ben doesn’t like (which admittedly, is very little these days).  I’ve been running out of ideas because again, he’s been gone a lot.  Grilled cheese and tomato soup.  Tuna melts (which I think I’m going to have to repeat again soon.  I forgot how good plain old tuna salad can be).  Old family favorites.  Easy Appetizers.

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There it is.  My single gal menu option favorite.  Give me a good dip and some hearty bread and I’m calling it a meal (uh, plus wine, right?).  Appetizers are my saving grace when I’m holding down the fort solo.  I fill up my plate and hurry back to my spot on the couch before it gets cold or, more likely, the dog has stolen my spot.  So when coworkers started discussing the pickle wrap or pickle roll ups the other day at work, needless to say, my ears perked.  I may have hearing damage from chemo, but you can be sure that if someone is talking food, I’m well aware and have an opinion.

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The pickle wrap is a simple thing – ham, spread with a layer of cream cheese, then a pickle dropped in the middle.  The pickle is rolled up in the ham cream cheesiness, sliced into bite sized chunks, and devoured.  I’m not ashamed to admit that my sisters and I ate these like crazy any time my mom made these.  God bless her, she didn’t want to serve the ends of the rolls to guests so as not to skimp on the pickle portion of the roll, so we’d stand by like dogs begging, waiting until we could snatch a bite.  So my coworkers chatting about this family favorite piqued my interest.  But as we all know, I can’t leave well enough alone.  I figured, if these bad boys were so tasty on their own, imagine if I amped them up a bit and, ya know, fried them.  I’m glad I did.

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Pigs in a Pickle/Deep Fried Pickle Wraps/Whatever You Want to Call Them

recipe:  jb’s pour house

1 lb. good quality deli ham, sliced thin (if you can get ham off the bone at your deli, do)

1 package cream cheese, room temperature

1 jar good quality miniature pickles, preferably kosher dill

1 package wonton or eggroll wrappers

1 egg

Canola oil

Lay a piece of ham across work surface and spread with a layer of cream cheese.  You want to cover the ham fully with a decent amount of cream cheese so you can taste it in each bite.  Cut the ham slice in half lengthwise and lay a pickle on each half.  If pickles are larger, you will want to cut in half.  Roll the pickle up and set aside.  Repeat with remaining ham, cream cheese and pickles.  Can be prepared to this point.

Whisk egg in a small bowl.  Lay wonton wrapper on work surface and place pickle roll on top.  Roll, jellyroll style, and secure wrap to itself by painting lightly with egg wash.  Fold in edges like a present (or eggroll) and secure each edge with egg wash.  You may find that your wonton wrapper is too short.  You can avoid this all together by using an eggroll wrapper and trimming of the excess or, you may cut a wrapper in half, secure it to the full wrapper using egg wash, and procede as described previously.  Repeat with remaining pickle rolls and wonton wrappers.  Freeze for 30 minutes and no more.

Place canola oil in a large wok or frying pan, enough to come up about 1 inch on the side of the pan.  Bring to 350 degrees over medium high heat.  Remove pickle wraps from freezer and gently loosen from plate/tray.  Place about 4-5 pickles in the pan, depending on size used, and fry until golden brown on all sides.  Remove and repeat with remaining pickles.

Eat immediately and be happy.

Don’t you wish there was some great appetizer eating event coming up like the Super Bowl?

- j

All content and photographs © 2010 – 2013 jb’s pour house

Resolutions

hoppin' john soup

Let me state the obvious – it is a new year.  Another obvious fact – it has been quiet here.  The truth is, I’ve struggled to find my voice, to find inspiration, to be motivated.  To take the time to photograph a recipe’s preparation and document the teaspoons, cups, temperatures and cooking times.  We’ve eaten well, don’t get me wrong, but I haven’t shared.  I’ve tried.  Looking through my photo files, I’ve amassed quite a collection of fragments of recipes.  Spices in a mortar and pestle, mise en place of veggies next to a steaming pot, pans of roasted chicken pieces, searing short ribs – I could go on.  But I didn’t.  And I’m not sure why.

black-eyed peas

Even in the simple act of admitting this, I struggle to find the right words.  Call it a giant case of writer’s block combined with a lack of creativity.  I’ve experimented so little this year with my own recipe creations, instead relying on my giant collection of bookmarked recipes on Pinterest.  Even WordPress had to stifle a chuckle when providing me with this blog’s 2012 stats.  Maybe it is due to our small, rented kitchen and a lack of a garden.  I’m sure a lot of it is due to my health struggles from earlier in the year and the slow recovery time before I felt like a glimmer of myself once more.  And I’m sure some of it is just plain apathy and laziness.

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It is a day of making goals, resolving to do things differently in the new year ahead.  I have a rather succinct list for myself, a tidy little plan for 2013.  One of those items is to find myself here more often, chatting with you and sharing a view into our kitchen.  I promise the recipes won’t all be show stoppers or JB’s Pour House originals, but they will be good meals worthy of a night on the couch watching re-runs of the Big Bang Theory or entertaining new friends.  Because that’s what we will be doing.  We’ll be opening a bottle of bubbly on a Tuesday, because why the hell not?  If there’s a lesson I learned in 2011-2012, it is to celebrate life’s little moments.

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So we kicked off this chilly start to the new year with hope for a little good luck.  I figured we could use all the help we could get this year, and a dish rooted in tradition with promises of prosperity wasn’t a bad way to start.  And I took pictures.  From start to finish.  Happy new year friends, and I’ll see you soon.

Hoppin’ John Soup with Garlic Rubbed Toasts

Adapted from Saveur

16 oz. dried black-eyed peas

2 meaty smoked ham hocks or 1 ham bone + 1/2 c. chopped cooked ham

1/2 – 3/4 tsp. crushed red pepper flakes

2 Tbsp. canola oil

4 cloves garlic, finely chopped + 1 clove garlic, peeled

2 carrots, diced

2 stalks celery, diced

1 large onion, diced

1 bay leaf

2 bunches collard greens, stemmed and leaves roughly chopped/torn

1/4 c. apple cider vinegar

2 Tbsp. – 1/4 c. hot sauce

Ciabatta

Olive oil

Kosher salt

Freshly ground black pepper

Bring black-eyed peas, ham hocks/ham bone, and 8 c. water to a boil in a large stockpot.  Reduce heat to medium low and simmer for 45 minutes.  Remove ham hocks/ham bone and set aside.  Remove 1 c. cooking liquid and set aside.  Drain black-eyed peas and wipe stockpot with a paper towel.  Return stockpot to medium high heat and add canola oil and red pepper flakes.  Once fragrant (do not let red pepper flakes burn), add carrots, celery, onion and bay leaf.  Saute for about 8 -10 minutes or until vegetables have softened.  Meanwhile, remove fat from ham hocks and dice meat, reserving bones.  Set aside.  Add garlic and saute for 1 minute.  Add 12 cups of water, reserved cooking liquid, ham bones, ham, drained black-eyed peas and collard greens.  Bring to a boil.  Once boiling, reduce heat to medium low and partially cover.  Simmer for 1 hour or until collard greens have softened.  Stir in vinegar and season to taste with hot sauce, salt and pepper.  Reduce heat to low until ready to serve.

Preheat broiler.  Slice ciabatta into 1 1/2 inch thick slices.  Cut individual slices lengthwise into thick strips.  Place on a baking sheet and drizzle lightly with olive oil.  Season lightly with salt.  Toast to desired color.  Remove from broiler and rub garlic clove across craggly surface of toasts.  Serve with Hoppin’ John Soup, preferably dunked happily into the broth.

Wishing you luck and prosperity in 2013,

- j

All content and photographs © 2010 – 2013 jb’s pour house

lobster rolls and slow-fried french fries with old bay aioli

What a difference a year makes.  365 days ago (although it feels a little like a lifetime ago), I was told I had cancer.  Tears welled up in my eyes as my doctor explained it was likely lymphoma (it wasn’t) and for the most part, I held it together as I left the doctor’s office.  I made it as far as the parking garage before I began to unravel.  Thread by thread, I fell apart as I sat in my car, cried, and desperately tried to reach my husband on every phone number I knew for him.

I drove home, tears blinding my vision, and once there, I hugged my pup, called my family one by one, and waited for Ben who was racing to get home to me.  My mind was spinning with questions – will I die?  Will I ever be able to have children?  What will treatment be like?  Is this going to hurt?  How did this happen?  This can’t be right, can it?  I will never forget that day.

A cancer diagnosis is comparable to being on a speeding train.  Once you step on, you hold on for dear life and watch as appointments, strange faces, and vial after vial of blood pass you by.  Your vision is blurred from the speed with which you progress and your mind spins with the abundance of information and medical terminology being forced into your brain.

But each day you wake up, you find the strength for another day and you meet the newest challenge.  Beginning to lose your hair and taking control of the situation by buzzing it into a mohawk for the hell of it and then, down to nothing but your scalp.  Buying smaller belts and eventually, smaller clothes as your body whittles away (not complaining too much about that one) due to your complete inability to eat.  Summoning the strength to take a shower and then curling up in bed, still wet, exhausted and in pain.  Shivering to the point of convulsions through one of the mildest winters ever as you fight the cold sensitivity.  Crying (and throwing up) at the drop of a hat.  It is a battle and anyone who tells you different doesn’t know.  But I do, and I have the warrior scars to prove it.

But time heals all.  One year has passed.  Thanks to the glorious power of Mederma, the scars have lessened.  The hair is growing.   Color has returned to my skin.  My energy grows with each passing day.  And I can eat again.  I can look back and be grateful for the love I have in my life and for the very simple fact that I still have a life to live.  I plan to do so.  My gusto and zeal has only been fanned by the fire of the lessons learned this past year.

Life is short, friends, I can tell you that much!  The small stuff is certainly not worth stressing over – believe me, there are much bigger issues to deal with.  Instead, I’m focusing my attention and energy on the things that matter most, the things that make me happy.  And it shouldn’t come as a surprise to anyone here, but I like to cook.  I like to drink wine with my husband.  I like to entertain friends and laugh.  I like to gather around a table blessed full of food and be grateful for the family sitting around it looking back at me.  I’ll be doing much more celebrating in the days ahead.  A random Tuesday?  Why sure, that calls for a bottle of bubbly and our best glasses.  Take the china out of the cabinet and use it, even if it is only to eat take out fried chicken to go with that bubbly.  There’s never a better chance than right now.

 

lobster rolls with slow-fried french fries and old bay aioli

recipe:  jb’s pour house, bon appetit

 

Lobster Rolls:

1 carrot, diced

2 stalks celery

1 shallot, thinly sliced

4-5 sprigs of dill

2 lemons

1 c. white wine

4 c. water

4 – 4 oz. lobster tails

1 tsp. Old Bay seasoning

1/2 c. mayonnaise

Salt and pepper

2 Tbsp. unsalted butter

Hot dog buns

 

Combine carrot, 1 celery stalk (diced), shallot, and 1 sprig of dill in a large saucepan.  Cut 1 lemon in half, squeeze juice into saucepan and add juiced halves to the pot.  Add whine, water and Old Bay.  Bring to a boil.  Once boiling, add lobster tails and return to a boil.  Boil lobsters for 1 minute per ounce.  Remove from heat and let sit for about 3 minutes.  Strain and let cool.

Once lobster has cooled enough to handle, remove meat from the shells.  Discard remaining solids.  Dice lobster into bite sized pieces.  Combine lobster, mayonnaise, and the juice of half a lemon.  Finely dice remaining celery stalk and add to the mixture.  Mince dill and add about 2 tsp. fresh dill to the mixture.  Stir well and season to taste with salt and pepper.  Refrigerate until ready to serve.

Melt 2 Tbsp. butter in a microwave safe dish.  Brush the inside of hot dog buns with melted butter and broil until toasted to desired color.  Spoon about 1/3 c. lobster salad per roll.  Serve.

 

Slow-Fried French Fries

2 lb. russet potatoes

Canola oil

Salt

 

Peel  potatoes and cut into long french fry sticks.  I’d recommend using thicker cuts than what I show in the photo – about 3/8″ by 3/8″.  Rinse and shake of excess water.  Place in a large, deep stockpot and cover with oil (you will likely use all of a large bottle of oil plus some).

Place the pot over medium heat and cook for 45 minutes, occasionally scraping the bottom with a heatproof spatula.  Be careful not to do this too often, or you will break your potatoes into many small pieces as I did.  Increase heat to medium high and cook until golden and crisp, about 20 minutes.  Using a slotted spoon, transfer fries to paper towel lined plate to drain.  Season to taste.

 

Old Bay Aioli

1 egg yolk

1/4 – 1/2 c. canola or olive oil

1/2 c. canola oil

1/2 – 1 lemon

2 tsp. Old Bay seasoning

 

Use a food processor or blender for  the best results.  Combine egg yolk and the juice of 1/2 lemon.  With the motor running, slowly stream in canola oil (you can use olive oil for a stronger taste).  The mixture will begin to thicken.  Stop motor, scrape down sides and add Old Bay seasoning.  Depending on thickness, continue to stream in oil until desired consistency is reached.  Taste and depending on preferences, add more lemon juice, oil, or seasoning.  Serve with fries.

 

Carpe diem!

- j

 

All contents and photographs © 2010 – 2012 jb’s pour house

Smokehouse Breakfast Bake

I love weekends.  In fact, my heart longs for a weekend with such intensity these days that after 5:00 p.m. on a Wednesday, I cannot believe we’re only midway through the week.  Harrumph.  That vacation I was dreaming about cannot come soon enough, I tell you!  It saddens me that summer, in the traditional sense, is almost over.  School is back in session (or will be soon), there are only two summer hours Fridays left at work, and soon, the pool will close for another season.  Sigh.  The pool has been an oasis for us in the heat of the summer sun, me bobbing about in my little floating orb and Ben standing flat foot in the water that rises above my head.  It inspires such laziness, which I adore, but it helps me to relax so much that I swear the pool is one of the few things that have kept me from going crazy these past few weeks.  The pool and wine.  Why lie?

So here I am, mentally rushing through the work week so I can spend my weekend mornings stretched across the couch with a cup of coffee in hand, a pup across my lap, and a good possibility of coupon clipping action.  Stress and worry free, just the way I order up my weekends.  Now I’m not a breakfast person during the week, mostly due to the fact that I can’t get my butt out of bed in enough time.  However, I do love breakfast on the weekends.  Although we have some great places in town, I don’t always want to go out and cooking really detracts from the lazy morning I relish.  Internet to the rescue.

A few weeks ago we hosted a brunch, the star of which was our house bloody mary mix.  However, a close second were the scrambled eggs.  I’d stumbled on a make-ahead recipe that truly was phenomenal, resulting in light, fluffy, golden eggs.  Here’s the best part:  lightly scramble a mass of eggs a day or two in advance, drop them in a baking dish, place in refrigerator, and ignore.  Day of?  Preheat oven, place pan in oven, cook and stir a time or two and voila – perfect eggs!  I loved it!  Laziness + deliciousness (+ brunch cocktail) = perfect Saturday/Sunday morning!

Now, you know me and you know I cannot leave well enough alone.  I needed to play, to accessorize, to oomph it up a bit.  I needed sexy eggs.  Now I don’t know if these ended up being sexy, but how does pretty damn good work?  Having weekend guests has been a bit of a constant for us this summer now that we are a bit more settled in KC.  On a recent weekend, one of our guests was a self-proclaimed barbecue guru (let’s call him Pork Belly) and I wanted to mix a little of KC’s finest into our morning meal.  I once made a comment to him about brisket for breakfast to which he responded “great idea!” so I knew this was a bit of an easy target…

We’re lucky enough to live a few blocks from a great little local grocer with the best meat counter in town.  It doesn’t hurt that they have an industrial sized smoker out front chugging clouds of hickory smoke and drool-inducing smells of smoking meat from it’s smokestack.  Lucky for us, they sell competition-quality barbecue, including the desirable burnt ends, so I had the start of a very good breakfast.  A few other flourishes here and there and the baking dish was sent to the refrigerator for a snooze.  Sunday morning dawned with moderate temperatures so turning on the oven wasn’t quite the torturous task it has been of late.  We sipped our coffee as our breakfast baked along on its own and once the timer sounded, the bloody mary mix and vodka came out and we sat to a lazy breakfast.  My kind of morning!

Smokehouse Breakfast Bake

recipe:  jb’s pour house

 

1 large white onion, very thinly sliced

2 Tbsp. unsalted butter

1 Tbsp. canola oil

1/4 c. barbecue sauce

1/2 lb. barbecue burnt ends, diced

2 Tbsp. unsalted butter

1 dozen eggs

1/2 c. heavy cream

1 c. sour cream

4 green onions, thinly sliced

8 oz. smoked Gouda, shredded

1 1/2 c. diced tomatoes

 

Set a large skillet over medium high heat.  Add onions, butter, and canola oil.  Stir often until onions are caramelized, about 15-20 minutes.  Remove from heat, add barbecue sauce and mix well.  Set aside.  Crack eggs into a large mixing bowl.  Add cream and season with salt and pepper.  Beat well until eggs are fully blended.  Place a large skillet over medium heat.  Add 2 Tbsp. butter.  Once melted, add eggs.  Scramble until eggs are just set but very slightly runny still.  Remove from heat.

Add sour cream, reserved caramelized onions, burnt ends and green onions to eggs.  Mix well.  Place eggs in a large ovenproof baking dish sprayed lightly with cooking spray.  Cover with shredded smoked Gouda.  Place plastic wrap over the baking dish and refrigerate.  Can be made several days in advance.

Remove dish from refrigerator and preheat oven to 350 degrees.  Bake for about 45 minutes, stirring after a half hour.  Remove from oven, add diced tomatoes, and serve, preferably with a brunch cocktail.

 

Happy weekend!

- j

 

All content and photographs © 2010 – 2012 jb’s pour house

 

Fresh Heirloom Margherita Pizza

I need a vacation.  The past three weeks have been pure craziness at work.  I’m dreaming of Excel and PowerPoint.  You know that is a sure sign that you are OD-ing.  I hate dreaming about PowerPoint.  Nothing angers me more than waking, feeling the stressful tension in my shoulders and realizing the night has provided me with no restful escape from the day.  It’s a sure way to make me grumpy and just sours my mood for the day.  It is also a sure way to keep me out of the kitchen.

At 5 o’clock, or whenever I manage to wrap things up for the day, I pack my laptop into my backpack, collect my things and head for home.  After a few minutes of bustling around the house and petting my pup, the laptop comes out and work begins anew.  At some point, I’ll retreat to the kitchen and find a few minutes for myself when I can focus on the things I want to focus on, my mind calmed by the rhythmic sounds of the knife hitting the cutting board.  One particular night, the fruit fly collection I’ve been working on had grown to the point where action was needed – immediately!  The beautiful heirloom tomatoes I’d picked up at the market were intoxicating the winged creatures and with a wave of my hand over the tomatoes, they dashed off in a wave.

Knowing my time was limited on this particular evening, I took a little help from Trader Joe’s and grabbed some pre-made pizza dough and some fresh mozzarella on my drive home from the office.  I snipped what are likely some of the last leaves from my basil plant as it gasps in the dry, insane heat.  No amount of water can save this year’s poor attempt at a garden…  With just a few simple steps, one of the prettiest pizzas I have ever created sat ready for the oven.  Now to find a bottle of wine…

Work still calls my name, but I’m taking the night off.  I’m trying to enjoy the last bit of summer and I might have to make this a few more times to ensure I’ve satiated my taste for ripe, fresh tomatoes.  Ha – if that ever happens, I’ll let you know!

 

Fresh Heirloom Margherita Pizza

recipe:  jb’s pour house

 

1 head of garlic, separated into cloves and peeled

1/4 c. olive oil

3-4 heirloom tomatoes

Fresh mozzarella, in whatever form you prefer, drained

1 prepared pizza dough

Salt and pepper

about 1/4 c. basil leaves, finely chopped

 

Preheat oven to 375 degrees.  Place garlic cloves and olive oil in a small oven-proof dish with a lid.  Roast for 40-45 minutes.  Remove from oven and let cool.  When ready to proceed, blend garlic and olive oil in a food processor until no large pieces of garlic remain.  Slice tomatoes in half and gently squeeze to remove seeds.  Slice into 1/4″ slices.

Increase oven to 500 degrees.  Lightly flour a work surface and roll dough out to desired shape.  Place on a baking sheet and bake for 5 minutes.  Remove dough from oven and spread roasted garlic oil/paste over the dough.  Place tomato slices across the dough.  Season with salt and pepper and scatter mozzarella over the top.  Return to oven and bake for 10 minutes.  Mozzarella should be melted and the crust should be golden brown.

Scatter finely chopped basil over the top, cut into slices, and enjoy.

 

- j

All content and photographs © 2010 – 2012 jb’s pour house

Caprese Flapjacks

Late into the evening, before dusk settles, might be my favorite time of the summer day.  The sun is low in the sky, bathing the trees in a golden light as the locusts buzz noisily in the warm glow.  If it weren’t so hellishly hot outside, I’d probably spend every evening on the deck enjoying the day’s lazy transition into a starry night.  But it is hellishly hot and no amount of rosé would be refreshing enough to coax me from the glorious air conditioning.  Given the heat, the oven has officially been put into hiatus until the mercury drops a bit.  Grilling had been our standby, but even that has been questionable lately.  It is so dry here that our county has put a ban on grilling.  How they think they are going to enforce that is beyond me…

We’ve been so busy lately between work and fun.  The stress level has been rising with the temperatures and a dip in the pool hasn’t been enough to wash away the worries of the day.  To top it off, insurance denied my follow up scan scheduled for last week, so we’ve been in limbo on that front as well as we wait for word on what comes next.  We needed a night off – a fun activity to change our focus for a few hours at the very least.  Luckily, we had tickets to a James Taylor concert in a great outdoor theater.  A perfect start to a relaxed evening.

The concert was starting early, well, early for us compared to our usual dinner time, so I needed something I could make quickly in the heat of the late afternoon.  Ben had been on the road for the latter half of the week, so I decided on one of his favorite summer dishes to welcome him home.  I’m not going to lie, this is one of my summer favorites too.  I usually wait to make this until my heirlooms are going crazy but without a proper garden again, I needed to rely on the friendly farmers at my neighborhood market for their lovely tomatoes.  My poor basil is being properly beaten by the heat of the summer sun, so this was a good way of using a bunch quickly and putting  it out of its misery.

The recipe comes together in a hurry with very few ingredients so it is perfect for a quick summer dinner.  It also makes an elegant appetizer for summer entertaining – and did I mention it goes perfectly with a chilled glass of crisp rosé?  Sets my heart a-flutter just writing those words!  Fresh, quality ingredients are really the key here and are what makes this dish sing.  Texture is also an important component – the couscous in the flapjacks retains a bit of its crunch after cooking which contrasts nicely with the softness of the fresh mozzarella and tomatoes.  Don’t skimp on the freshly cracked black pepper or the Fleur de Sel.  It truly is the crowing glory on this jeweled napoleon of summer deliciousness.  Alternating with different colored tomatoes only enhances the beauty of this serenade to summer in a dish.

Caprese Flapjacks

recipe:  jb’s pour house

 

3 Tbsp. salt

½ c. hot water

2 c. lukewarm water

16 oz. fresh mozzarella, sliced into ¼” rounds

1 c. couscous

4 Tbsp. flour

1 tsp. sugar

½ tsp. baking soda

¼ tsp. salt

1 ½ c. buttermilk

1 c. basil leaves, tightly packed

2 egg whites, slightly beaten

2 Tbsp. canola oil

Cooking spray

2 heirloom beefsteak tomatoes, preferably different colors, sliced into ¼” rounds

Freshly ground black pepper

Fleur de Sel

 

Combine salt with ½ c. hot water in a medium bowl.  Stir until all salt has dissolved.  Add remaining 2 c. water and add mozzarella slices.  Drain after about 10 minutes.

Combine couscous, flour, sugar, baking soda and salt in a medium bowl.  Using a mini food processor or blender, combine basil with ½ c. buttermilk and blend until basil is finely chopped.  In a small bowl, combine basil-buttermilk, remaining buttermilk, egg whites and canola oil.  Whisk wet ingredients into couscous mixture.    Heat a griddle over medium-high heat.  Lightly coat with cooking spray.  Using about ¼ c. batter per flapjack, pour four flapjacks onto griddle.  Cook 4-6 minutes per side until golden brown.  Repeat with remaining batter.

To serve, place one flapjack on a plate.  Add one slice of tomato, sprinkle with about 1/8 tsp. Fleur de Sel, and about 1/8 tsp. freshly ground black pepper.  Add a slice of mozzarella.  Repeat with alternate color tomato, Fleur de Sel, pepper and mozzarella.

 

Cheers!

- j

All content and photographs © 2010-2012 jb’s pour house

BLT Chicken Pasta

Holy cow, summer is going by so quickly!  I can’t believe it is mid-July.  Back to school specials abound and I can’t help but feeling a little sad that summer is almost over.  But then I remember that here in the “northern South,” summer continues well into September (I just love that Southern Living magazine calls KC part of the South – it gives me lots of excuses to make the Southern food I adore!).  Tomato season started early and I have lots of plans for the jeweled orbs.  The farmers markets are overflowing and I’d better get while the getting is good before the impact of this draught starts to catch up with the grocery stores and markets.

I must admit to a bit of laziness and a severe lack of creativity when it comes to cooking this summer.  Maybe that is due to the roller coaster ride I’ve been on this past year.  I think the other part of it is that I don’t have a garden for the second year in a row.  I have nothing going crazy in my backyard, demanding I dream up new and exciting ways to prepare it.  A friend brought over some fresh jalapenos from her garden and I smiled, recalling the numerous recipes I searched and dreamed up to use our plethora of peppers.  A girl can only eat so many jalapeno poppers…

The other aspect of my noticeable absence has been that we have just been so busy!  Last summer flew by in an instant between Ben starting his job, selling our house, making the official move to KC, and then, the nasty C-word.  This summer, we’ve welcomed many friends into our home, traveled to see friends and family, and bummed about town with lazy days at the pool, baseball games, happy hours and more.  One such evening took us to Shakespeare at the Park where we packed a few bottles of wine and a picnic and laughed at the whimsy of a Midsummer Night’s Dream.  Midsummer…

One of the dishes I prepared for our picnic left me with lots of delicious spinach dip left over.  Given its consistency, I felt that it would be better served in another dish versus on its own, scooped with chips or crackers.  Laziness prevailed yet again, so I opted for ease, convenience and rotisserie chicken, a girl’s best friend.  The creamy sauce and spinach got me thinking of an alternate BLT and then I couldn’t help but tinker.  I liked this dish served warm, but it’s likely pretty tasty chilled too and perfect for a picnic or Midsummer Night’s Dream.

BLT Chicken Pasta

recipe:  jb’s pour house with assistance from Food & Wine

 

1 rotisserie chicken, skin removed and shredded

5 slices bacon

1/3 c. sliced onion

2 garlic cloves, minced

1/2 box pasta (any shape), cooked according to package directions

1 c. heavy cream

1 8 oz. box frozen chopped spinach, thawed and squeezed dry of excess moisture

1 pkg. Philadelphia cooking creme, plain

1 lemon

Salt & pepper to taste

2 large tomatoes, diced

 

Place bacon in a medium skillet over medium heat.  Saute until crisp, about 10 minutes.  Remove from heat.  Add onion to pan and saute until translucent and starting to brown, about 7 minutes.  Add garlic, saute for 30 seconds and remove from heat.  Set aside.

In a large saucepan, boil the cream until reduced by half.  Keep a close eye on this as you don’t want to allow the cream to boil over.  Add the dry spinach and stir to incorporate.  Add the cooking creme and stir until melted.  Add the juice of half of a lemon.  Add half of the chicken, reserving the remainder for another use.  Add pasta, bacon, onion mixture and tomatoes.  Mix well to incorporate.  Season to taste with salt and pepper.  Can easily be doubled.

 

Enjoy!

- j

All content and photographs © 2010-2012 jb’s pour house

Peach Fuzz

I was having a really great day.  It was Friday, the official kickoff to the weekend was only hours away, it was sunny and 80 degrees – it just doesn’t get much better.  Then I went to the doctor.  Buzz  killed.  It was time for my four week follow up with radiation.  He asked me all of the usual “how are you doing?” questions and I answered positively for all.  Then it came to the hair.  I haven’t seen much in the way of hair growth following radiation and had been paranoid that I would be one of “those people” who didn’t have hair come back after treatment.  At all.  So, I pulled the scarf off of my head and he took a good look.  His next few words made my stomach drop.  “I’m pessimistic about your hair growth.  If you don’t see anything more in the next two months, this will be the permanent state of your scalp.”

Gulp.  31 years old, female, and bald.  Not quite what I had in mind for my recovery.  I realize that I have made a major recovery from a pretty scary kind of cancer.  But allow me to be vain for just a bit.  I never wanted to look like a cancer patient in the first place, and I certainly never wanted to do so on a permanent basis.  I asked what more I could do to encourage hair growth.  Vitamins?  Diet?  Nope.  Nothing I could do.  The saying goes when life hands you lemons, you make lemonade, right?  Well, when I want peach fuzz, I’m going to make a peach cocktail.  And take drastic measures.  Friends, today I bought Rogaine.  Well, the Target version.  That stuff is expensive!

So here I go on my hair growth journey.  I’m taking pre-natal vitamins, a super B-complex vitamin, eating more protein, having my thyroid checked out, and using Rogaine.  Giddy up.  I will have hair again if I have anything to say about it.  It seems my doctor might have been a little premature in his assessment too.  Phew.  Most of the medical sites and patient forums I saw online indicated 3 months to a year before hair was really growing again.  So, it sounds like I have a while to wait and that I’d better purchase a few more caps and scarves in light, breathable fabrics to get me through the sweltering summer.  And maybe I’ll have to make a few more of these to get me through the summer too.  Just call it my “rain dance” cocktail – but for hair.

sparkling peach melba

recipe:  jb’s pour house

1/2 bag frozen unsweetened peaches or 3 ripe fresh peaches, sliced

6 oz. raspberries

1/4 c. sugar

1 bottle Asti, chilled

1/2 c. vanilla cognac (or make your own)

Combine peaches, raspberries and sugar in a mixing bowl.  Carefully toss and let fruit macerate for about 20-30 minutes.  Working in batches, puree fruit in a food processor or blender.  Place puree in a pitcher.  Slowly add half of the Asti to the puree, as the Asti will bubble and fizz quite a bit.   Stir, and add half of the cognac.  This will cause the fizz to dissipate.  Slowly add the remaining half of the Asti.  Add the remaining cognac.  Stir well and chill until ready to serve.

Raising a glass to hair,

- j

All content and photographs © 2010-2012 jb’s pour house

Lowcountry Longing

There is something about the Lowcountry that calls to me.  I can’t explain what exactly, but I know that whatever it is stirs something deep within my soul.  It is a siren song that beckons to me with its spindly live oaks dripping with Spanish moss, the ebb and flow of the tidal waters through the marshes, and the iconic lighthouses that dot the shore.  The pace of life is slower there – something Ben was quick to remind me of as I became frustrated with a driver who was waiting for Christmas before he’d make his left turn.  Once I reset my mind and my expectations, I fell into the pace of the South and felt its warm, comforting arms wrap around me as the sun shined and the palmetto branches waved in the coastal breeze.  Ah, vacation.

Our annual trip to Hilton Head Island was certainly anticipated, but I didn’t realize just how desperately Ben and I needed to unplug, unwind, and relax – that is, time off without the inclusion of a medical professional.  My sisters, brothers-in-law and parents packed up and prepared to join us on the beach for a little R&R and it was just what the doctor ordered.  Can I get a prescription for a few more of those, please?  Maybe a year’s supply?  With auto refill?  I digress.  On the beach, I felt a little less like a conspicuous cancer patient.  With my floppy beach hat, it was almost hard to tell I was covering my bald head.  That is, until a nice gust of wind launched the hat from my head and sent it tumbling across the sand as I shrieked and scrambled to catch it.  Sigh.

On every trip, Ben and I always wax on about how we could move there and set up a little home off island.  He’d run a wine shop, I’d run a restaurant.  We’d fill our days with our pipe dreams and when vacation ended, talk of those escapades disappeared with the retreating tide.  This trip was no different and we talked about how there wasn’t really a place on the island that did everything just right – at least, not right according to our standards.  This time though, the conversation felt a little more real.  There was a little more urgency to “pulling the trigger” knowing what we’ve just been through.  This time, we talked about timelines, about building up a nest egg before taking the plunge.  Will it ever happen?  I don’t know.  But, why not?  One lesson I’ve learned is life is too short to wonder “what if?”

But a vacation it was and those days, unfortunately, are always numbered.  So we boarded a plane and flew home to the Plains to our little pup and our beloved Kansas City.  The Lowcountry longing continues for me.  It is always strongest in the days when I first return home, when “Carolina On My Mind” plays on an endless loop in my head, when I search the horizon for the wave of a palmetto and look up into the branches of our oak tree, desperate for a glimpse of tangled moss.  Alas, I never find what I’m looking for and the feeling starts to slowly recede.  This time, however, those Lowcountry longing days might be numbered.

blackened shrimp with roasted red pepper and goat cheese grits

recipe:  jb’s pour house

1 red pepper

6 c. water

1 1/2 c. stone ground white grits

1/2 c. heavy cream

1 Tbsp. unsalted butter

5 oz. goat cheese

1 lb. wild American shrimp

2 Tbsp. blackening spice (our favorite is from Magnolias in Charleston, SC)

2 Tbsp. unsalted butter

1 Tbsp. canola oil

Preheat broiler.  Cut red pepper in half and remove core and seeds.  Press each half flat onto a baking sheet.  Place directly under broiler and roast until skin is black.  Remove from the broiler and place pepper halves in a sealable container or plastic bag.  Let the pepper steam for 10 minutes.  Peel skin and discard.  Dice pepper and set aside.

Bring 6 c. water to a boil.  Once boiling, slowly add grits, stirring constantly.  Reduce heat to low and stir constantly for about five minutes to prevent grits from sticking to the bottom of the pan.  Let the grits simmer on low heat for about 30 minutes, stirring frequently.  Once grits have absorbed most of the water, add cream and butter.  Stir to incorporate.  Add reserved red pepper and goat cheese and stir until goat cheese is thoroughly incorporated.  Season to taste and keep on low heat until ready to serve.

Combine 2 Tbsp. butter and canola oil in a medium skillet over medium high heat.  As pan is heating, toss shrimp with blackening spice.  Add shrimp to pan and saute, about 3-4 minutes or until shrimp are cooked through.  To serve, place about 1/2 – 3/4 c. grits in a bowl and top with shrimp.

Until next time HHI,

- j

All content and photographs © 2010-2012 jb’s pour house

 Welcome back.

I think one of the hardest things a foodie can endure in life is cancer.  Now I’m not saying cancer is a walk in the park for anyone because it just isn’t, plain and simple.  But in my experience, it was additionally difficult as I watched this disease whittle away at not only a hobby, but a defining facet of who I was.  Without me in the kitchen, Ben and I started to lose out on one of the things we enjoy most about our relationship – our mutual love of food and wine, shared nightly at our little dining table.  A severe deficit of energy, an extremely sensitive stomach and an esophagus ravaged from radiation treatments ensured not only weight loss (hey skinny jeans!) but an utter lack of interest and desire to do anything in the kitchen, including re-arranging the dishwasher per my OCD tendencies.

Thankfully, all of that is changing.  Treatment is over and with each day, I get stronger.  And more hungry.  And more ambitious.  So it should go without surprise that I am starting to have random ideas and crazy cravings again.  The first on my list?  Passion fruit curd.  As I hunted the local Asian market for 100% passion fruit juice, I mentioned my idea to Ben – I wanted to make a passion fruit curd and fill angel food cupcakes with the delightfully sweet and tangy concoction.  A random stranger stopped in her tracks, looked at me and asked if I own a bakery.  When I said that I didn’t and I just really liked food, she continued on her way.  Ben looked at me and said “Bet that made your day.”  I grinned.  It did.

Well, finding passion fruit proved harder than I anticipated.  That is, until I went to Foodie Mecca, aka Whole Foods.  I love this place.  It is so easy to be inspired while walking through the aisles of pristinely displayed produce, freshly baked breads, piles of gourmet cheeses, oh, I could wax on.  But, last I checked, I don’t have a job in the Whole Foods marketing department, so let’s move on.  I happily strolled through the store and made my way to produce.  Jackpot – passion fruit!  I was off to the races.

So I learned something very quickly this weekend.  I am r-u-s-t-y.  Five months of quality couch time had not sharpened my skills.  This was a great idea that I think still has merit, but I’ll be the first to admit that this recipe did not turn out as expected.  That might have a little something to do with me overcooking the curd and scrambling my eggs a little.  Or, being a little too shaky to separate eggs and starting over not once, but three times when making the angel food cake.  In the past, I probably wouldn’t have shared this recipe until I had it right.  But you know what?  Life’s too short.  And I have a lot of cooking to do.  Welcome back, friends!

- j

Passion Fruit Curd Filled Angel Food Cupcakes

recipe:  jb’s pour house

 

7 passion fruits

2 large eggs

1/3 c. sugar

3 Tbsp. unsalted butter, diced into small pieces

1 3/4 c. sugar

1/4 tsp. salt

1 c. cake flour

1 dozen egg whites, room temperature

1/3 c. warm water

1 tsp. orange extract

1 1/2 tsp. cream of tartar

 

For the passion fruit curd:  Cut passion fruits in half.  Using a spoon, scoop flesh from passion fruit and place in a saucepan.  Bring to a gentle simmer and remove from heat immediately upon simmering.  Stir constantly for five minutes.  Pour fruit puree and seeds into a fine mesh strainer positioned over a small mixing bowl.  Using a spatula, press juice and pulp through strainer until only seeds remain.  You may have to bruise a few seeds to get them to pop and release juice.  Be sure to scrape the bottom of your strainer before discarding seeds.  Set passion fruit puree aside.

Combine 2 eggs and 1/3 c. sugar in a saucepan or bowl.  Fill another saucepan with about 1 inch of water and bring to a boil.  Once boiling, reduce heat to low.  Add passion fruit puree to sugar/egg mixture and place saucepan/bowl over the prepared double boiler.  Whisk constantly for 8 minutes or until mixture has thickened and coats the back of a spoon.  Remove from heat.  Place butter, one small piece at a time, in curd and whisk until incorporated.  Repeat with remaining butter.  Transfer curd to a container and place a section of plastic wrap directly on the surface to prevent a skin from forming.  Refrigerate for up to 2 weeks.

For the angel food cupcakes:  Preheat oven to 375 degrees.  Combine half of the sugar, the salt and cake flour in a mixing bowl.  Set aside.  In the bowl of a stand mixer, combine egg whites and cream of tartar.  Using a whisk, incorporate cream of tartar into egg whites thoroughly.  Add water.  Place bowl on stand mixer and whisk on high until doubled in volume.  Slowly add in remaining half of sugar and whisk until medium peaks form.  Add orange extract and whisk for about 30 seconds more.  Remove from stand mixer.  Sprinkle in about 1/3 reserved flour mixture and fold into egg whites.  Repeat with remaining 2/3 flour.  Carefully spoon batter into mini muffin pans.  Bake for about 12 minutes or until a toothpick inserted into the center comes out clean.  If making regular sized cupcakes, bake for 17 minutes.  Cool completely.

Fill a plastic bag with curd.  Using a paring knife, puncture a small hole in the bottom of cupcakes.  Snip a corner off of the bag filled with curd and pipe curd into hole on bottom of the cupcakes.  Repeat until all are filled.